Gazing Upward

May23rd

2 Comments

I love that three of my four kids can read. It’s like revisiting my childhood when I share with them books that left such strong impressions on me as a kid.  It’s also nice when I can encourage (enforce) reading time which oh so quietly occupies them.  Then I can escape to my room to decompress and bury my nose in my own book.  For this introvert, that’s my happy place!

With long summer days ahead, and all the free time that I (naively) envision having, I’m excited to delve into an ARMFUL of books I’ve had sitting on my nightstand for months.  Here are some of the ones I’ve pulled to read….

The Whole-Brain Child
12 Revolutionary Strategies to Nurture Your Child’s Developing Mind
by Siegel and Bryson

I started this book a year ago but got caught up in end-of-the-year festivities before I finished it. So I’m picking it back up.  The authors are a neuropsychiatrist and a parenting expert who put their heads together to create a guide for helping children develop emotional intelligence.  It’s an informative yet entertaining read. They give a clear explanation of how the brain is wired, and then they provide practical ideas to help kids balance their emotions with logic.  For a mom of a child who can spiral downward in rage or anxiety, this book is an incredible tool!  My favorite tip – if your child is nervous before a big game, performance, audition, or interview, tell them to add simple equations in their head. 1+1=2     2+2=4      4+4=8.   By employing the logical left side of the brain, you balance out the emotional flood of anxiety from the right side and become calmer.  Caroline swears this helped her with dance tryouts!  The authors give an example of swimming….you can’t swim well with just one arm; it’s imperative to use both!

How to Really Love Your Child 
by D. Ross Campbell

Now I did borrow this one, so I’ll just have to take notes.  Campbell co-authored The Five Love Languages of Children with Gary Chapman. This book similarly helps parents understand the emotional needs of children and how they perceive and receive love.  Having made some recent observations, I’m suspecting that my 8-year-old, Grace, is not feeling fully loved and accepted, despite my all the words of affirmation, hugs, kisses, etc.  A friend found this book to be very insightful for her family, so I’m looking forward to implementing some of the ideas and skills to ensure that my daughter feels unconditionally loved.  There’s definitely a parenting trend among our generation to avoid strict discipline or else harm your child’s psyche. But that’s not what this book is advocating.  This is more about how you connect with and engage your child in everyday life, not just when they act out.

Are My Kids on Track?
by Goff, Thomas, and Trevathan

Can you tell I’m on a parenting-revamp kick?  Ironically, these books just happened to appear on my radar this past week. I certainly wasn’t searching for books on the emotional health of kids. In fact, it all sounds very hokey. But I had already been thinking about how to better teach empathy. And when I heard the authors on an episode of “The God-Centered Mom” podcast, I knew this book would point me in the right direction. There are various milestones for emotional, social, and spiritual development. And it’s our job as parents to help our kids grow in these areas at the appropriate pace so they can flourish.  For Caroline, who was adopted at age 12, these milestones have come much later because she didn’t have a typical or loving upbringing.  While I was initially more attracted to this book for the sake of my littles, I’m predicting that it will be very applicable to my oldest.

Giddy Up, Eunice
Because Women Need Each Other
by Sophie Hudson

Sophie Hudson is well-known as the author of the Boo Mama blog. She ‘s also located right here in  Birmingham, Alabama!  I fully expect this book to have me in side stitches from tearful laughing fits. And I also expect to be inspired to step outside my circle of friends and pursue relationships with women across generations.  There are several older women who live on my street who have countless stories I’m eager to hear.  Time to put the kettle on for tea!

Uninvited
Living Loved When You Feel Less Than, Left Out, and Lonely
by Lysa TerKeurst

I’ve actually already finished this book, but it so deeply resonated with me that I have to share.  This book is for anyone who has ever felt rejected, insecure, inadequate, or overlooked.  I would venture to say that every single person falls into this category.  With wit, vulnerability, and Scriptural references, Lysa teaches how to process hurt in a healthy way so you can handle future rejection with more confidence, and most importantly, recognize the unwavering love of Christ that steadies the soul and heals the heart.

Nothing to Prove
Why We Can Stop Trying So Hard
by Jennie Allen

I am a huge fan of Jennie Allen. She appears to be one of the most grounded, theologically-sound, humble, and genuine women doing ministry today. In her latest book, she speaks to those who feel like they’ll never be enough or measure up.   I can’t help but feel that way some days as I scroll through Instagram pics.  Pointing the reader to Jesus, Jennie illustrates the freedom and power that come when you admit your weaknesses and needs, and then allow God to meet them.

Steadfast Love
by Lauren Chandler

Lauren is the wife of Matt Chandler, the lead teaching pastor at The Village Church in Dallas. If you’re looking for some great sermons, check him out!  Seven years ago, Matt was diagnosed with a malignant brain tumor.  Lauren writes of the journey of faith God took them on during such a terrifying and uncertain time.   It’s hard to worship when you’re stuck in the hard places, but Lauren reminds us that we can experience the steadfast love of God during those seasons.  And we will come out of those valleys stronger and victorious when we allow Him, and nothing else, to be the anchor of our souls.

The Residence: Inside the Private World of the White House
by Kate Andersen Brower

I find a lot of great ideas and encouragement from parenting and Christian living books. But I also love a good page-turner, from suspenseful mysteries to coming-of-age novels to biographies and memoirs!  I’m particularly fascinated by true life accounts and personal stories.  Recommended by a fellow bookworm, The Residence is like the Downton Abbey of the White House.  Amazon describes the book as “an intimate account of the service staff of the White House, from the Kennedys to the Obamas.”  And it’s a fun companion to my current TV binge-watching show, Designated Survivor.

 I’m always looking for more recommendations! Especially in fiction.
What’s on your summer reading list?

2 Comments

  • Comment by Joyce — May 23, 2017 @ 2:51 pm

    So nice to see you back on your blog : )

  • Comment by Kelley — May 24, 2017 @ 6:09 am

    Joyce! So fun to reconnect with old blog friends! 🙂 And your blog header and design are gorgeous!!! I don’t know when you updated it, because I haven’t visited blogs in so long. But it looks amazing! Thanks for commenting!

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